RV Floor Plan Basics

Considering purchasing a new or used RV? Do you want a motorhome, travel trailer, fifth wheel, or toy hauler? There’s a lot to consider when choosing the right RV for you. Here’s a quick guide to RV floor plans, and how to choose between them. 

Motorized or towable?

The very first choice you will need to make, do you want to drive your RV or tow it? There are advantages and disadvantages to both. If you’re leaning toward towing, check out our towing capacity guide to make sure your vehicle can tow your next RV.

What kind of motorhome?

Just like with towables, size matters in motorhomes. There are three main types of driveable RVs: Class A, Class B, and Class C, motorhomes, all of which differ in size and shape. 

The Jayco Alante 29F is one of our most popular Class A motorhomes, and as you can see, it resembles a bus that comfortably fits a family inside. Many Class A RVs use diesel instead of standard gasoline, and come with many luxurious features that make them a higher priced option than most Class C’s.

The Jayco Swift 20T is an example of a Class B RV, which runs significantly smaller than Class A or Class C motorhomes, and resembles a typical passenger van on the outside. On the inside, there’s enough room for a couple to vacation out of, while keeping the vehicle small for driveability. Many campers even boondock in more rugged editions of Class B’s, such as the Jayco Terrain, an adventure Class B. 

The popular Jayco Redhawk 31F is a well known example of a Class C RV. Known for their cab over bunks hanging over the driver’s seat area, Class C’s are the original motorhome, and their high quality for families or couples has stood the test of time. They come in gasoline or diesel, depending on the model, and drive more like a large truck than the more bus shaped Class A’s. 

What kind of travel trailer?

There are even more options for travel trailers than motorhomes, not including fifth wheels, which are towed differently than travel trailers and run considerably larger. 

The Forest River Grey Wolf 22RR is considered a toy hauler, which is a travel trailer designed to fit other vehicles inside, such as motorcycles or four wheelers. The ramp door for vehicle entrance is on the rear of all Forest River toy haulers, so that ramp door also doubles as a party deck! Many toy haulers come with no slides, to keep the weight of the RV down to account for the heavy vehicles inside. These are great for couples or a small family who values outdoor adventures. 

Single axle trailers have just one pair of wheels holding them up, such as this on Jayco Jay Feather Micro 199MBS. Only very lightweight travel trailers are constructed this way, and most single axles are for couples. They’re the easiest trailers to tow and park, as well as the lightest. 

The 2022 Jayco Jay Flight SLX 8 267BHS is a double axle travel trailer due to its four wheels. It’s also an example of a bunkhouse floor plan, due to the bunk beds in the rear that serve as an additional sleeping area to the queen bed up front. Bunkhouses are great for families, particularly Jayco’s double bunk bed setup which creates spacious sleeping areas for all family members. However, RVers who travel solo or as a couple tend to prefer floor plans without bunkhouses, to have more room in their kitchen or living areas. 

The Jayco Eagle 332CBOK is a large couple’s travel trailer, which lacks bunks and has space for a larger living area. 

Now that you know the basic floor plan styles of motorhomes and travel trailers, you are ready to browse more detailed varieties of RV floor plans. For more RV tips, tricks, and news, follow our Pete’s RV Info Blog today!

RV Refrigerator Guide

Cooling down your food and drinks in the summer is no joke, be informed about RV refrigeration! 

The three most common types of refrigerators you will see in a RV are 12 volt, gas electric style, and residential. Here’s a quick guide on each:

The popular gas electric style of refrigerators are the best kind to use for boondocking. They can cool and freeze food running off of just propane or electricity, without any enhancers necessary. They do take 3 – 6 hours to efficiently cool down, and your RV must be perfectly level in order to ensure that the refrigerator technology can cool at the campsite. 

gas electric fridge

12 volt refrigerators operate from the 12 volt battery on your RV. They are efficient with power usage, but they are smaller in size in order to keep up this efficiency. If you don’t have an enhanced battery system or solar setup on your RV, you may want to avoid using a 12 volt fridge on a boondocking trip, since this fridge pulls right from your RV battery. 

12 volt fridge

Full residential refrigerators are increasing in popularity in many fifth wheels and large travel trailers. They’re often as large as refrigerators in a standard home, they cool reliably, they don’t use a lot of power, and are far less expensive than gas electric refrigerators. Being a larger refrigerator, it is more difficult to remove them from RVs, and a converter is required to power them. 

Residential Fridge

Each type of refrigerator is very reliable, many RV fridges last for decades at the same quality as the day of purchase. The refrigerator you choose is based on your own boondocking habits and power needs of your RV. 

For more RV tips, tricks, news and info, follow our Pete’s RV Info Blog today!

Tips for RV Camping at the Beach

It’s that time of year again: the season of hot weekends where you want to enjoy both the campground, and the shores of your favorite beach or lake. Why not both? Here’s some tips for beach camping. 

The first thing a beach skeptic might point out is, there will be sand everywhere! To help tame this within your RV, put an outdoor rug in front of the door for feet to be wiped on. Next to the rug, you can make a little foot wash station with a simple bucket of water and a towel so people can wash feet and legs before dirtying up the RV. 

The most important part of sand prevention in the RV world is keeping sand out of your gray water tank. You’ll want to hose off outside as much as possible before showering and filling that tank with sticky sand waste. 

Once your sand situation is secure, make use of the shade! Your RV awning is large and shady, roll it all the way out and bring your own beach umbrella and sunscreen. You’ll appreciate the lack of sunburn after the trip is over. 

If you’re camping super close to the ocean, congratulations! But you don’t want to get washed out by high tide. Check in with the app Tides Near Me so you and your RV don’t get submerged. Make sure to also put all belongings into the RV at night so no beach toys wash away. 

Finally, make sure you pick a great beach to camp on! Here’s a handy guide of a few great ones.

For more RV tips, tricks, and news, be sure to follow our Pete’s RV Info Blog today! 

Modern Buggy Trailers Now Available At Pete’s RV Center

Introducing the Modern Buggy Little Buggy, the newest and tiniest trailer available at Pete’s RV Center dealerships.

The Modern Buggy Little Buggy

From midwest RV manufacturer Modern Buggy trailers, the Little Buggy is designed to be towed by family SUVs and cars, to open up more camping opportunities to those without a large towing capacity.

According to the Modern Buggy website, “This trailer is built on an industrial strength, high quality custom steel frame, and is welded together with hand-crafted aluminum and fiberglass parts.  Loaded with a 3500lb torsion axle, heavy duty diamond plated wheel wells, a steel front lip storage/battery box, accessories hitch, and a custom stainless steel roof rack, the Little Buggy is built to climb on, pull behind, and carry your adventure gear!”

The Little Buggy is also equipped with solar panels to power its amenities, such as the electric stove, USB charging stations, vent fan, and lights. Its 20″ ground clearance and 31″ all-terrain tires are perfect for all kinds of off-road and boondocking trips.

Check out this video with Modern Buggy Trailers Owner Wally Holem for more details about the Little Buggy:

And be sure to follow our Pete’s RV Info Blog for more dealership and RV news, service tips, and more!

Best State Parks for RV Camping

We’ve heard all about America’s most beautiful National Parks, for RV camping and all sorts of infamous adventures. But what about the often overlooked state parks? There are many of these hidden camping gems throughout the United States, and some provide the camping trip of a lifetime. Here are a few of Pete’s RV Center’s favorites.

Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada

Return Visit to Valley of Fire State Park Nevada

Less than an hour outside of Las Vegas, this picturesque park boasts 40,000 acres of red Aztec sandstone, along with petroglyphs from over 2,000 years ago. 

According to the website, “There are two campgrounds with a combined total of 72 units. Campsites are equipped with shaded tables, grills, water and restrooms. A dump station and showers are available. All campsites are first-come, first-served. A camping limit of 14 days in a 30-day period is enforced.RV Camping: RV sites with power and water hookups are available.”

Gooseberry Falls State Park, Minnesota

Minnesota's most popular state parks for camping

Close to the north shore of the Great Lakes, this gorgeous state park features stunning waterfalls and views, along with a splendid fishing scene. There are hiking, biking, and snowmobiling trails for many seasons of fun, and 60 RV friendly campsites. 

Letchworth State Park, New York

Astonishing: A Fantastic Day Trip to Letchworth State Park – Dang Travelers

New York has the most State Parks of any state, highlighted by this one, known as “The Grand Canyon of the East”. With 340 campsites and over 60 miles of trails and gorgeous views, this is the true highlight of western New York. 

John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, Florida

RV Camping at John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park in Key Largo - Florida  Family Nature

For a more tropical camping experience, check out what’s known as the first undersea park in the United States. With 47 campsites with RV hookups, it’s one of the only parks in this region without hurricane damage, and provides a great setting for a beach camping vacation. 

For more featured RV camping spots, maintenance tips, and more, follow our Pete’s RV Center Info Blog today!

Checklist for Opening Your RV In the Spring

It’s that happy time of year again! Time to pull the cover off of your RV and get it ready for a spring and summer of happy camping. Here’s some key steps for the process known as dewinterizing your RV. 

Washington State Evergreen Spring RV Show | Monroe, Washington | Westlake  Promotion

Check all tires

Just like cars and bicycles, inactive RV tires lose significant psi of air pressure each month of inactivity, especially if stored in the cold. Driving an RV with underinflated tires is one of the most unsafe actions an RVer can do, so be sure to give your tires an air pressure and wear and tear check up. 

Give it the once over

How Much Weight Can An RV Roof Hold? - (Answered & Explained)

Do a walk through of all potential water damage spots on your RV’s exterior, especially the roof and hitch. Check the sealant around windows and doors, and look for any cracked seams in the roof caused by snow pile up. 

Check your batteries

Using a voltmeter while your RV is disconnected from electricity, check the charge and water level in your battery, then adjust it accordingly. 

Flush out the antifreeze

Even if the antifreeze you use is non-toxic, you still don’t want it in your drinking water. Drain your fresh water holding tank entirely, add potable water back in, then turn the water pump and all faucets on, and let the system drain for several minutes. Flush the toilet a few times during this process. When the water comes out clear, close the faucets and the pump. Then, take the water heater off bypass mode, and replace all water filter cartridges that were removed for storing the RV. Make sure to dump your gray and black water tanks at an official dump site, as they are still full of antifreeze. 

You will also want to sanitize your water system to remove any mold that built up in storage. After doing so, check for any leaky pipes or plumbing issues. 

Check your propane

RV Dual Propane Tank Rack Installation *Wolf Pup* - YouTube

 Reinstall all propane tanks and make sure the hose is tightly fitted. Check for potential propane leaks by putting soapy water on all hose connections. If bubbles form, it could indicate a leak. Retighten after the process is complete. Check if your state requires propane tank recertification. Then make sure all of your propane-run appliances are working by giving them a quick test, especially on each stove burner. If you have a generator, check its oil levels. 

Freshen your filters

Air and water filters collect lots of dust and mold, so change them out at the beginning of each camping season. Make sure that your air vents are also functional with a good flow of air. 

Be safe

Don’t forget to update the smoke alarm batteries, fire extinguisher, carbon monoxide detector, and LP detector. Restock your RV first aid and emergency supplies, get rid of all expired dry food. 

After all those important updates, you’re all ready to camp! For more RV tips, tricks, and news, follow our Pete’s RV Center Info Blog today. 

How to RV Responsibly

With the enormous rise of new RVers since 2020, here’s how to avoid being the troublesome neighbor at the campground.

  1. Plan your campsite ahead of time. There are numerous apps for finding RV campsites, from traditional spots at KOA’s to boondocking recommendations in the desert, there are campsites for every taste out there. The most important part about choosing one is  researching beforehand. Some good apps for this are iOverlander, the Dyrt, Free Roam, and Outly. 
  2. Leave No Trace. Just like you wouldn’t want to leave parts of your RV behind after the trip, the great outdoors doesn’t want to permanently change because of your RV. Practice leaving no trace by picking campsites that have already been used by vehicles in the past, carrying out all of your trash, only dumping at approved waste stations, and most importantly, never dump black water on the land.
  1. Be campfire conscious. Much of the United States is at near constant risk of wildfires, and many campgrounds have little wood left in the area from ambitious firestarters. Many campgrounds recommend only lighting a fire if you need it for warmth or cooking. If you must make one, never leave it unattended, and extinguish it with lots of water. 
  1. Be mindful of quiet hours, and the location of your pets and children. 

There’s nothing better than friends and food at the campground. Follow the Pete’s RV Info Blog for more information about how to be the best RVer you can be!

A Guide to Using RV Propane Tanks

The All-Important tanks on the front of your travel trailer might just be the most versatile tool in your RV. Propane lets campers cook, run heat, make hot water, and power appliances, all without needing to connect to electricity. It is frequently recommended that campers who are connected to electricity use propane sparingly.

To maintain your propane tanks, make sure to do the following:

Keep watch of the age of your propane tanks. The manufacturing date is stamped on the tank, and it needs to be replaced or recertified after 12 years. 

Turn on your fridge the night before with propane, so it’s cold enough at the start of the camping trip. Switch to electric if you’re going to a campsite with a hookup.

Check the propane flow by “bleeding” the system. Turn on your stove and let the flames burn until they’re blue. This gets the air out of the propane lines, clearing out room for you to turn on other appliances. 

Greystone 21 Inch RV Gas Range, 12 Volt, LP | Way Interglobal RV Appliances

If you smell gas, turn off all propane tanks and RV appliances! The strong smell of propane gas indicates a leak, and you’ll need to replace the seal and tank. Do not attempt to repair leaks yourself, as propane is stored in its tank at -44 degrees, which will give you frostbite at the touch. 

Keep a working carbon monoxide alarm and propane safety alert inside your RV.

Avoid using propane in a moving vehicle, and always keep your RV well-ventilated when cooking or using propane inside. 

The RV Cooking Bible | I Heart RVing

For more RV tips, tricks, and news, follow our Pete’s RV Infoblog!

Essential RV Tips: Using Antifreeze

It’s that time of year again: time to dump lots of brightly colored liquid into all of your RV drains. You Need Antifreeze! What do you need to know about it?

RV and Marine antifreeze, conveniently packaged in the same bottle, surprisingly doesn’t protect against freezing, which isn’t necessarily harmful. It’s designed to prevent bursting, the plumbing damage that comes from ice freezing, expanding, and then rupturing. A rupture can result in gallons of pipe water flooding into the RV, causing a headache of damages. 

“RV antifreeze rated for -50 F and -75 F will start to freeze at around 20 F, but it won’t freeze to the burst point until -50 F or -75 F respectively.

In parts of the country where temperatures go into minus digits and stay there you should use the -100 F antifreeze for added protection. This type freezes at about -20 F, but provides burst protection to -100 F.” Said girlcamper.com. 

The most important part of using antifreeze is draining as much water or waste liquid from the pipes as possible. Antifreeze mixed with diluted water from an undrained pipe will burst far sooner than the temperature estimates on the bottle that assume there’s little to no water in the pipe. 

After winter is over, you can fill your pipes without water once again without worrying about draining the antifreeze, which is typically nontoxic. Of all the preparation your RV needs for winter, put antifreeze–and saving your pipes–at the top of the list. 

For more tips about winterizing your RV, check out our Winterization Tips with Pete’s RV Guru Randy Murray. 

Pete’s RV Center Joins America’s Largest RV Show

Pete’s RV Center is proud to have attended the 52nd Annual America’s Largest RV Show in Hershey, Pennsylvania this past week for the first time as a RV Dealership Group.

61,320 people attended the four day show from September 15th – 19th, according to the Pennsylvania RV and Camping Association. This was the second largest recorded attendance ever at the show, close behind the 2017 record. The area around Hershey’s Giant Center was filled with over 1,200 RVs from over 30 different manufacturers.

Pete’s RV Center was stationed next to both the Jayco and nuCamp displays, bringing several dozen RV Lifestyle Consultants in our famous Yellow Shirts.

Both the Jayco and nuCamp RV displays were popular with showgoers, reflecting RV enthusiasts’ taste for the quality craftsmanship and reputation of Jayco, along with the eye-catching and lightweight teardrop trailers by nuCamp. 

Some of the most popular RVs on site were the Jay Flight 264BH and 284BHS, the T@G 400 BOONDOCK, the White Hawk 32BH, Jay Feather Micro 199MBS, and several different Jayco Greyhawk motorhomes and T@B Teardrop Campers. This reflected the many styles of RVs at Pete’s RV Center, from teardrops and lightweight travel trailers to couples motorhomes to family style bunkhouses.

“The Hershey Show got positive reviews from industry attendees, more so at this point than most exhibitors could have imagined – the message being that the modern surge in pent-up retail demand is apparently continuing despite the well-known limitations regarding dealer inventories,” said RVBusiness.com, noting that the RV industry hasn’t seen a show this large since fall 2019.

The Hershey Show is unique not only for being America’s Largest RV Show, but for giving attendees the ability to purchase RVs right at the show, and potentially save on transportation costs.

“In addition to RVs, campgrounds, vacation destinations, RV parts, products and camping supplies are also available,” according to the Largest RV Show website.

“Demand is still there,” Jayco President Ken Walters told RV Business, emphasizing that product that could be delivered at the show was a high priority for the customer. “People wanted it, and they wanted it now.”

With Pete’s RV Center’s Pennsylvania dealership located just 27 miles from Hershey in Mountville, Pennsylvania, the show isn’t over. Our Hershey Inventory is still available at our special Showgoer Pricing at https://www.petesrvpa.com/hershey