Jayco Announces Terrain 4×4 Class B

Jayco is continuing to drive headfirst into the Class B RV landscape with the new Terrain 4×4. Built on a Mercedes-Benz Sprinter chassis, it’s built for offroading, with “on-demand four-wheel-drive that allows for the freedom of off-road adventures. The interior offers luxurious appointments to provide all the comforts of home, the company said, and its 48-volt lithium power system offers true off-grid performance,” said RV-Pro.com

The Terrain is 19’7” in length, just over a foot shorter than Jayco’s other recent Class B offering, the Swift. The Terrain also differs in its tires, visibly designed for off-road action, while the Swift has more typical street tires. A large roof rack, rear mounted ladder, and Koni-sourced shock absorbers complete the rugged look for an off-road adventure. 

For more details on the Jayco Terrain, check out Jayco’s product page

And be sure to follow the Pete’s RV Infoblog for all of your RV news, tips, and updates!

Maintaining Your RV’s Roof

Out of sight, out of mind is not a cliche that should be applied to RV roofs. They should be cleaned several times per year, and inspected for any potential issues.

During cleaning, scrub your RV roof with a medium bristle brush, or any other brush recommended by the manufacturer. You can use a cleaning liquid while doing this, but be sure not to use cleaners made with petroleum solvents, abrasives, or citruses, as those will weaken the strength of the roof materials. 

After scrubbing, rinse the whole RV thoroughly, both roof and exterior walls. Any grime dripping off the roof will go down the exterior walls, and if not rinsed, will leave ugly stains. 

Inspecting the roof while cleaning is vital, and should be done thoroughly. Check all sealants and seams, skylights, vents, and roof rack for mold and cracks. Fix any rips or tears immediately, before they snowball into other problems. 

To passively protect your RV roof from weather damage, keep it away from weather, and avoid the sun! RV storage facilities are ideal for protection, but RV roof covers will separate the roof from the elements. Be sure to use a proper RV roof cover and not any other kind of tarp, which can reduce airflow and result in mold.

At Pete’s RV Center, we have all of your RV maintenance needs in mind. Visit us at petesrvcenter.com to find a location near you!

Pete’s RV Center Joins America’s Largest RV Show

Pete’s RV Center is proud to have attended the 52nd Annual America’s Largest RV Show in Hershey, Pennsylvania this past week for the first time as a RV Dealership Group.

61,320 people attended the four day show from September 15th – 19th, according to the Pennsylvania RV and Camping Association. This was the second largest recorded attendance ever at the show, close behind the 2017 record. The area around Hershey’s Giant Center was filled with over 1,200 RVs from over 30 different manufacturers.

Pete’s RV Center was stationed next to both the Jayco and nuCamp displays, bringing several dozen RV Lifestyle Consultants in our famous Yellow Shirts.

Both the Jayco and nuCamp RV displays were popular with showgoers, reflecting RV enthusiasts’ taste for the quality craftsmanship and reputation of Jayco, along with the eye-catching and lightweight teardrop trailers by nuCamp. 

Some of the most popular RVs on site were the Jay Flight 264BH and 284BHS, the T@G 400 BOONDOCK, the White Hawk 32BH, Jay Feather Micro 199MBS, and several different Jayco Greyhawk motorhomes and T@B Teardrop Campers. This reflected the many styles of RVs at Pete’s RV Center, from teardrops and lightweight travel trailers to couples motorhomes to family style bunkhouses.

“The Hershey Show got positive reviews from industry attendees, more so at this point than most exhibitors could have imagined – the message being that the modern surge in pent-up retail demand is apparently continuing despite the well-known limitations regarding dealer inventories,” said RVBusiness.com, noting that the RV industry hasn’t seen a show this large since fall 2019.

The Hershey Show is unique not only for being America’s Largest RV Show, but for giving attendees the ability to purchase RVs right at the show, and potentially save on transportation costs.

“In addition to RVs, campgrounds, vacation destinations, RV parts, products and camping supplies are also available,” according to the Largest RV Show website.

“Demand is still there,” Jayco President Ken Walters told RV Business, emphasizing that product that could be delivered at the show was a high priority for the customer. “People wanted it, and they wanted it now.”

With Pete’s RV Center’s Pennsylvania dealership located just 27 miles from Hershey in Mountville, Pennsylvania, the show isn’t over. Our Hershey Inventory is still available at our special Showgoer Pricing at https://www.petesrvpa.com/hershey

How to Check Your Travel Trailer for Maintenance

Whether in the middle of a camping season or after a long winter, inspecting your travel trailer for any maintenance needs is a vital component of keeping your RV healthy. Here’s a helpful checklist of what to look for when you’re checking out your RV.

  1. The Roof. Look for any holes or cracks where water could possibly enter the RV, damaged sealant, soft spots, damage to any solar panels, or mold. Just like a house, a damaged roof can bring down the whole RV. 
  2. Walls. Check the interior and exterior of all walls for cleanliness, holes or cracks, warping, which indicates water damage, sealant leaks around the windows, and soft spots.
  3. Tires. The date the tire was made is stamped on the tire, so inspect that and the general condition of the tires, which can erode if left uncovered. Look for uneven wear patterns between the different tires, which could indicate a bent axle. While you’re at it, check your axles for holes and rust. And don’t forget to inspect your spare tire!

  1. Underneath the Travel Trailer. Often overlooked by those unwilling to crawl under the RV, the undercarriage’s condition is fundamental to holding the RV together. Excessive rust, holes where animals could enter, dangling or disconnected wires, accident damage or a bent frame, or any visible holding tank issues are a few important things to look for. 
  2. Outside Connections. Power, cable, water, and sewer connections should all be routinely inspected, because you don’t want to go without any of them! Check if the water leaks out of the connection point, or leaks during water tank dumping. 
  3. Driving Components. Lights, brakes, turn signals, and the emergency disconnect switch should all be checked on to avoid hazardous driving. 
  4. Propane Tanks. The tanks collar will state the year they were manufactured, and propane tanks must be recertified once they are over 12 years old, and every 5 years after that. Make sure you don’t smell propane when the valves open, which indicates a leak in the connecting hose. Replace your tanks if they’re rusty or turning a dark color. 

For more RV maintenance tips and tricks, follow our Pete’s RV Center Info Blog today!

Pete’s RV Center to Break Ground on 7th Dealership Location

On September 1st, Pete’s RV Center owners Todd McGinnis, Chad Shepard, and Scott Borden announced plans to start construction on a sixty acre parcel of land located in Saco, Maine.

The Vermont-based company is planning to break ground in January 2022 and be completed in early 2023. The Maine dealership will be Pete’s RV Center’s seventh location, and will be a state-of-the-art facility with a spacious showroom, parts and accessories store, and service center with multiple bays.

Pete’s RV Center – Maine is set to carry a wide variety of travel trailer, fifth wheel, and motorhome brands, including Jayco’s full lineup.

Saco, Maine is just four miles from Old Orchard Beach and 17 miles from Portland, both iconic destinations for RVers.

“Maine is called ‘Vacationland’ for a reason.  We’re thrilled to get the opportunity to become a community fixture in the Saco and greater Portland area, plus be surrounded by amazing campgrounds, beaches, and national parks,” remarked Pete’s RV co-owner Chad Shepard.

Along with the flagship store in Vermont, Pete’s RV Center has dealerships in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Indiana, and South Carolina.

For more Pete’s RV news, events, and inventory, check out https://www.petesrv.com/–location-maine today!

Boondocking on a Budget

boondocking (noun) — RV camping without being connected to water, electricity, or sewage, usually in a remote or wild location. Synonyms: dry camping, free camping, wild camping.

What Is RV Boondocking? - Gander Outdoors

One of the most exciting ways to go RV camping, boondocking can be a great new way to spice up your summer. But are you prepared to ration supplies, go without WiFi, and camp off the grid? The Dyrt magazine has a comprehensive guide to all things boondocking, check it out below!

At Pete’s RV Center, we’re here for your RV adventures! Find your next RV or schedule a service appointment at petesrvcenter.com today!

How to do Laundry on a RV Road Trip

One of the big mysteries of full time RVing to those who don’t live on the road is how do full time RVers do laundry?

The easiest way is the laundry machines often placed in RV parks. One RV blogger said that “I can count on one hand the number of RV parks that didn’t have laundry machines.” Despite this frequency, not all RV parks have enough laundry machines for the number of RVers within the parks, and not all RVers stay in RV parks! Additionally, hunting down all the quarters required to use a park laundry machine can be a struggle in an increasingly cash-less world, especially with the sometimes high cost of laundry machines. 

Mountain View Campground in Morrisville, Vermont boasts many amenities along with laundry machines

Another solution is using a local laundromat, typically easy to find on Google, but not always found in remote areas. Most laundromats do have a machine for getting quarters though, making it easier to stock up for more washes down the road. Some even have laundry machines that can be activated with a credit card swipe. 

Not every roadtrip situation offers the flexibility to wait around on laundry machines, though. That’s why many RVers have gotten creative with portable laundry devices. 

This portable washer-dryer has two neighboring tubs, one for washing and the other for spin drying. It takes up to 10lbs washing capacity and has a drainage tube for emptying the dirty water, and runs off the 120v power similar to most RV refrigerators. Most reviewers do say that after the spin dry clothes are still damp though, so an additional investment of a drying rack is also recommended. Keep in mind that many RV parks do not allow outside clothes lines to dry your own clothes. 

A smaller personal laundry option without needing to use your RV’s precious electricity is the Scrubba, which is popular with backpackers. It works by filling the bag with laundry, water, and detergent, rolling the bag down and clipping it, twisting the valve to deflate, then rub the clothes on the Scrubba’s internal washboard for anywhere between 30 seconds and five minutes. You then unclip, pour out the water, and rinse clothes with fresh water in the Scrubba, and they are now clean and ready for the drying rack. 

Perhaps the most luxurious RV laundry option is having washer and dryer hookups within your RV, which is becoming increasingly popular in luxury fifth wheels. The laundry cycle can take a few hours this way, and you won’t be able to do this while boondocking, as it requires a lot of power and water, but is temptingly easy if your RV is plugged in one place. 

No matter how you keep your clothes clean on the road, Pete’s RV Center has all of your RV camping needs in mind. Follow our infoblog today for more RVing tips, tricks, and news!

Maximizing RV Gas Mileage

The roadtrip of your dreams in your own RV is an inexpensive way to see the world, without the pricey hotels and restaurants that can raise travel costs. But beware, the cost of gas can raise roadtrip rates significantly. Here’s some strategies for limiting your pain at the pump. 

Start Small

If you’re looking to purchase a RV, consider an upgrade–in the form of a downsize. Small RVs often pack in just as many features and amenities into a less gas-guzzling frame. There are more options than ever for smaller RVs, including micro travel trailers that are several thousand pounds lighter than most towable vehicles. 

Jayco Jay Feather Micro

If you’re shopping for a motorized vehicle, Class B RVs such as the Jayco Swift are exploding in popularity. The size of a standard van, they are by far the most fuel efficient–an easy to park–motorhome. 

Jayco Swift

Turn off the engine

Idling is the worst way to burn fuel, and very environmentally destructive. According to the jayco.com blog, “a test performed by the Edmunds.com automotive staff showed a fuel savings of up to 19 percent by shutting the engine down at each stop (10 stops) during a 10-mile test drive, rather than letting the engine idle during the two–minute stops over the same 10-mile, 10-stop test route.” 

Be smart about cruise control

Using cruise control on those long, mostly flat stretches of uninterrupted highway can save both your foot and gastank. However, keeping it on in mountain filled areas will force the vehicle to use extra gas to maintain the cruise speed, wasting lots of fuel as the engine speed rises to climb the mountains. 

Pack Efficiently

Fill that huge water tank at the campground. Buy groceries near the campsite. Leave behind everything you don’t really need, because camping is about keeping it light and having fun anyway. 

What to Consider When Buying Your RV

You know you love road trips, but how do you choose which RV is right for your family when so much goes into it on and off the road? Here are a few things to think about before diving into this purchase. 

Driveable or towable?

Maybe your fancy new pickup truck is ready to tow a few thousand pounds across the country, or maybe you don’t own a vehicle with any towing capacity at all. Either way, you’ll need to seriously consider whether you prefer a towable or driveable RV. 

RVers for decades have debated whether motorhomes or towable RVs are easier to drive. Motorhomes provide the convenience of having just one vehicle to worry about, giving them the loving nickname of a “house on wheels”. But despite being one compact unit, many motorhomes end up being larger than many towable travel trailer setups. 

Despite the frequently tiny size of travel trailers, many people just don’t like towing something. You’ll have to give a motorhome a test drive, and then tow a travel trailer, to see where you land on this debate. 

What are you towing with?

If you do end up choosing a towable RV, that’s great! What are you going to tow it with? The answer to that question will determine how big or small your travel trailer, or even fifth wheel, can be. Some travel trailers, like this Little Guy, can be towed by a vehicle as small as a Toyota RAV4, a small SUV. But Fifth Wheels, typically the largest towable RVs, can sometimes top 15,000 pounds. 

The most important part of owning a towable vehicle is towing safely, so be sure to do your own research about what your vehicle can and cannot tow before proceeding. 

Cargo Capacity

Keeping size in mind, your RV’s cargo capacity will tell you how much weight you can put in it. This includes everything you’re bringing along, so while your campground bathing suits are lightweight, the full 60 gallon freshwater tank is definitely not. 

Cargo capacity isn’t as big of a deal if you’re camping in one place all summer, where water refills and waste dumping is easier, but it’s important to keep in mind on more road heavy trips. Extra storage in and around the RV is also essential for those bringing a significant amount of luggage. 

What is your RV for?

Are you permanently retiring in your RV, which you plan on parking in Florida forever? Are you working remotely and driving to a different National Park each night? Are you camping at one campground for two weeks each summer? 

It’s good to have at least a rough idea of how you’ll be using your RV before you buy it. If you’re on the road daily, you’ll want to seriously consider purchasing as small an RV as you can, to save more gas and generally make driving easier. 

Many state and national parks do not have campground spots for RVs longer than 35, or sometimes even 30 feet. Even if you plan on parking in one private campground, check if they have any size restrictions. 

Buying a RV is the highlight of a lifetime for many campers, and your big purchase deserves the same enthusiasm! Check out our RV Education section at petesrv.com for more information about RVing, and the best RV selection around in our inventory!

East Coast RVing–Camping in the National Parks

RV dealerships all across America are filled with dreamers, those planning scenic road trips of a lifetime to the National Parks. Camping in the National Parks is a major reason why many people purchase RVs, and a fantastic way to spend time in nature. But with 63 National Parks in the United States spanning 84 million acres, how will you ever decide where to camp? Here are some of the best National Park RV friendly campgrounds to choose from.

Elkmont Campground, Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Located near North Carolina and Tennessee’s shared border, The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the most visited National Park, totaling over 12 million visits in 2020, despite being briefly closed due to the pandemic. This is more than three times greater than the second highest total of 3.8 million visits at Yellowstone National Park.

What makes the Smokies so popular? Its location is convenient for many travelers, being far closer to major East Coast population centers than the parks out west. And its neighboring town Gaitlinburg, Tennessee offers several full days worth of tourist attractions, and several hotels. 

Luckily, Elkmont Campground has 200 drive up sites for a lovely camping experience in the mountains, no hotels necessary.

Schoodic Campground, Acadia National Park

Another East Coast favorite, Acadia National Park boasts Cadillac Mountain, the highest point on the East Coast, where the sunrise can be seen the earliest in the United States. Its beautiful summit is famous for attracting sunrise spotters for this reason. The park has beautiful ocean views from its place on the Atlantic Coast, and is mostly located on Mount Desert Island, near Bar Harbor, Maine. 

However, Schoodic Campground is Acadia National Park’s newest, and it’s the only campground on the mainland section of the park, located on the quieter Schoodic Peninsula. 

New River Gorge National Park and Preserve

America’s newest National Park is still somewhat of a secret, having just gained National Park status in late 2020. While the park “provides opportunities for primitive camping only” according to their website, that won’t stop adventurous RVers from boondocking on the gorgeous riverside! There are several campsites along the park’s main road. 

For more RV campground tips in the National Parks, check out Campendium’s extensive list!