A Guide to Using RV Propane Tanks

The All-Important tanks on the front of your travel trailer might just be the most versatile tool in your RV. Propane lets campers cook, run heat, make hot water, and power appliances, all without needing to connect to electricity. It is frequently recommended that campers who are connected to electricity use propane sparingly.

To maintain your propane tanks, make sure to do the following:

Keep watch of the age of your propane tanks. The manufacturing date is stamped on the tank, and it needs to be replaced or recertified after 12 years. 

Turn on your fridge the night before with propane, so it’s cold enough at the start of the camping trip. Switch to electric if you’re going to a campsite with a hookup.

Check the propane flow by “bleeding” the system. Turn on your stove and let the flames burn until they’re blue. This gets the air out of the propane lines, clearing out room for you to turn on other appliances. 

Greystone 21 Inch RV Gas Range, 12 Volt, LP | Way Interglobal RV Appliances

If you smell gas, turn off all propane tanks and RV appliances! The strong smell of propane gas indicates a leak, and you’ll need to replace the seal and tank. Do not attempt to repair leaks yourself, as propane is stored in its tank at -44 degrees, which will give you frostbite at the touch. 

Keep a working carbon monoxide alarm and propane safety alert inside your RV.

Avoid using propane in a moving vehicle, and always keep your RV well-ventilated when cooking or using propane inside. 

The RV Cooking Bible | I Heart RVing

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