2016 Keystone Montana Fifth Wheel Features

2016 Keystone Montana Fifth Wheel Features
Friday, June 5th, 2015 21:44:12

North America’s #1 Selling Luxury Fifth Wheel for†14 Consecutive Years. The right inspiration leads you to achieve greatness whether you are vacationing, adventuring or just relaxing. Montana fifth wheels enable you to achieve all three. To do this, Montana designs fifth wheels to provide enduring pleasure over the long haul and in every aspect of the ownership experience. Montana builds RVs that inspire.

 

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Keystone RV Montana Fifth Wheels | Avaliable at Pete’s RV Center

RV Lifestyle Consultant Joe Vartuli and Keystone RV Montana Representative Chris Stender meet up to walk you through the extravagant features found in Montana Fifth Wheels including:

  • Patented Max Turn Front Cap with Hitch Vision and LED Profile Lighting
  • Solid Surface Countertops
  • High Gloss Gel Coated Fiberglass Exterior
  • Glazed Hardwood Cherry Cabinet doors and Drawers
  • Wireless Back-up Camera within Vehicle Mobile Display
  • Electric Fireplace
  • Heated Exterior Convenience Center
  • iRelax High-Density Posture Mattress
  • Slam Latch Pass Through Storage Compartment Doors
  • Stainless Steel Appliances
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Some additional features to make you love Montana fifth wheels:

  • Enclosed, Insulated and Heated Holding Tanks and Dump Valves
  • Washer/Dryer Prep
  • 6 Point Hydraulic Automatic Leveling System
  • Flush Mounted LED Interior Lights
  • MOR/Ryde Hitch Pin Box
  • Optional Heated Bedroom and Bathroom Floor w/ Legacy Package
  • Frameless Windows
  • Residential French Door Refrigerator
  • Solar Panel Prep
  • Sound Bar with Sub-Woofer and Bluetooth

Be sure to browse all features and specifications for Montana fifth wheel floorplans at PetesRV.com!

Video Transcript | 2016 Keystone Montana Fifth Wheel Features (Part 1 of 2) (CC)

Joe: Hi, I’m Joe Vartuli, RV lifestyle consultant here at Pete’s RV Center in South Burlington, Vermont. We’re going to do a great feature video today on the Montana product, the number one luxury fifth wheel brand for the last 14 years and we have a terrific guest. We have the number one sales rep from Keystone, from Montana. His name is Chris Stender and he’s going to go through this, these trailers with us and show you the reason why Montana separates itself from the other brands. we hope you enjoy it and pay attention, he has some great stuff for you. Chris I’ll let you start and you can, you can kind of go on some of the stuff that, that you feel that, our customers really will, it will make a difference for them.

Chris: Thank you Joe. What sets us apart from the competition is, with a Montana product, I always tell people there’s three things in life. We’re going to pass away, we’re going to pay taxes, and you’ll see a Montana in the campground. †we have more repeat buyers than any other brand in the history of the RV business.

Joe: They’re very loyal.

Chris: It’s not uncommon to talk to customers that on their second, third, and fourth units. You just sold another Montana to some folks that are on their …

Joe: Yep, it was …

Chris: Thirteenth Montana.

Joe: Yeah, it was quite amazing, very loyal. they love, they’ve loved every single one they’ve had. and his sister is actually on this, her seventh. So, once again, brand loyalty and because of the features you’re going to go over is why they’re so loyal to it.

Chris: (clears throat) Absolutely. One of the main features that we introduced back in 2010, 2011, was the radius interior ceiling. If you notice the exterior ceilings are all radius because of water runoff, but we have a radius interior ceiling. The benefits of that Joe, is number one, it feels larger in the family room and also once we get in the bedroom you’ll notice we have up to 6 foot 8 head room in the front bedroom. Also, by using the radius interior ceiling Joe, is we use a 5 inch radius roof truss. What that allows us to do is gives you the same amount of insulation in the middle as in the center. So, if you look at a lot of your competition Joe, [00:02:00] and this right here is a, is a molding piece that we use as far as design in our coach, but I use it to compare the competition so if you’re …

Joe: You can really see the arch.

Chris: So if you’re looking at a competitor that has a flat interior ceiling, remember we talked about everybody has a radius on the outside for water runoff, so if you’re looking at flat roof on the inside, it a-, could only do one thing. It can only taper, so if you notice when the competition talks about insulation, they may talk that they have the 5 inch, the 6 inch thick laminated roof. But remember one thing Joe, is they may be the thickest part right here, but as you notice when you get to the edges here, how it tapers.

Joe: They taper down, correct.

Chris: So you could maybe start at 5 and 6 inches, but as you work your way to the left or right you can get all the way down to 1 inch. So that right there is not a consistent insulation package in the competition.

Joe: Now, that is a steel, a galvanized steel roof trussing correct?

Chris: We use a, it’s a composite roof truss that we’re using right now.

Joe: Composite, okay.

Chris: We’re using stamped steel roof truss. Previously, it’s a composite. What it does Joe, is allows us to fasten our 3/8 inch decking more securely.

Joe: Correct, and it’s still a breathable attic system, which has made Montana famous.

Chris: Absolutely, we have an attic vent like most people have in their homes where your competition that uses a laminated roof does not have an attic vent. That laminated roof will trap a lot of condensation, a lot of heat in the ceilings. And also, what they’re doing for their air conditioning ducting system and the laminated roofs, Joe …

Joe: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Chris: Is all they’re doing is notching out the styrofoam so as we know, air conditioning has condensation in it, and there’s only one way to go. It goes up in the ceiling. Where in the Montana, we have a continuous ducting system from front to back, we use a 2 inch by 8 inch insulated ducting system, which has radius corners because cold air does not like square corners.

Joe: Yep.

Chris: And that way it gives you that, consistency throughout, [Crosstalk 00:03:50].

Joe: It will stay even no matter what the temperature.

Chris: Because we’re using the dual zone thermostat, which you can set a seper-, a separate temperature in the family room, then a separate temperature in the front bedroom as well. And another thing I want to point out [00:04:00] also, when you talk about the radius ceiling, is it also allows me to give you more overhead cabinet space. Because as we know Joe, the Montana owners use these for extended amounts of time. They could use them for weeks and months at a time. Typically they’re not the buyer that leaves on a Friday, comes home on a Sunday so the first thing that’s really important to this buyer is interior storage. You can never have too much counter space, too much interior storage, so as you notice how they swing open Joe, is you can maximize your overall height.

Joe: Right.

Chris: A lot of your competitor use the flip up overhead, where you could only limited so much room that you can put in there.

Joe: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Chris: So it’ll give you maximized space. Also, talk about space as well also Joe, is we now offer 10 floor plans in the Montana brand. And also, on top of the 10 floor plans, 5 of the 10 floor plans Joe, you can get an 18 cubic foot residential refrigerator. On our 10 floor plans we have our standard 18 cubic foot RV Norco refrigerator, which runs on propane and short power.

Joe: And gas and that is a brand new, that is the brand new 18 cubic foot by Norco right there.

Chris: Brand new 18 cubic foot, where before we were using 12. So now, the 10 floor plans that offer the 18 cubic foot RV refrigerator, you also have the 5 that offer the 18 cubic foot residential with ice maker, so really Joe, at the end of the day you have 15 Montana floor plans.

Joe: And that’s, that’s great for the discriminating buyer that wants to spend a lot of time in their fifth wheel and travel, or even do a seasonal. You’re not running out of storage to put things, to put food, just great convenience items that, that really help this coach be separate from the others.

Chris: Also, when you talk about the kitchen as well too, is standard on the Montanas you have a 70/30 stainless steel sink covers.

Joe: Yep.

Chris: Stainless steel sink with sink covers, also you have a bi-fold stove top cover as well also. Because when you’re not using this [00:06:00] you can put it back on as additional counter space. 30 inch microwave, which is also a standard convection microwave.

Joe: Correct.

Chris: Some of our competitors out there may not offer a convection, but they also may, they also may, they also may offer it as a not a stand alone, maybe optional as well too.

Joe: And that’s, that’s just like you’d find in your house as well. You can bake in that, you can use it as a traditional microwave, but very residential. Once again, you’re into a coach that has a lot of residential stuff.

Chris: Absolutely, because you know, they want the residential feel because you know, this buyer, the Montana owner is on the road. You know, they’re gone for weeks and months at a time and this is their home away from home.

Joe: Yep.

Chris: And a lot of things we do as far as to make you feel at home is, is solid hardwood throughout, okay. Montana has been known for the innovative features, also the floor plans. You know, we have a lot of great floor plans like I mentioned, 10 of them and then the 5 with the additional, residential refrigerators and we’ll go through another one here in a few minutes. But we also talk about residential and with that, LED flat screen TV’s. All of our TV’s in our family room and our bedroom are on swing arms. Also, in the Montana we use the dimplex brand fireplace. It’s a top of the line, it’s a 5100 BTU fireplace. Some people have asked me about heat pumps. Remember one thing, heat pumps only force air out of the ceiling and they don’t work under 42, 43 degrees.

Joe: Correct.

Chris: So what the fireplace does, it runs on electric so you can save on propane, and that takes the chill out of the air. This will give you 20 to 30 degrees additional heat up to 85 degrees in the coach.

Joe: hi folks. We’re back in the, the master bedroom suite of the new residential living Montana. just there’s some, a lot of great new features that they’ve done, in these new coaches and I’ll have Chris go over a few of them. I’m noticing right away is the difference in the closet. It’s, they’ve [00:08:00] taken out the cabinet in the middle, they’ve given you a, room for a washer dryer, one on each side. also you still have plenty of hanging clothes, storage as well. Right behind Chris is a bigger window that they’ve put into the new residential living model.

Chris: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Joe: And also the seat here. That, that lifts up and there’s a hamper in there for your clothes so you have a dirty clothes storage I guess, huh?

Chris: Absolutely, out of the way.

Joe: Or you could use it for shoes or whatever else you want as well.

Chris: Sure.

Joe: once a-, also I see around the bed, when Josh goes around it. You put new stands in on each side plus the, the 110, uh hookups on each side too as well.

Chris: Sleep apnea machines are more and more popular.

Joe: Yes.

Chris: And Joe, what we’ve done is made these counter tops much larger, brought the 110 outlets up. Also, you still have those down on the side walls as well too, but this is very important for people here. Also, individual LED reading lights. We don’t have the map lights which get hot. These are brighter, last longer, and give off less heat.

Joe: And use less energy too, yep.

Chris: Absolutely. The new front wardrobe Joe, we were talking about, is all of our floor plans in the Montanas except for the front living room because of the washer dryer prep being in the kitchen in the 3720, 3721 RL …

Joe: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Chris: Which the washer dryer preps are in the hallway, all of our front closets you could put the washer on the right hand side and the dryer in the left hand side. All you do is just removed the middle shelves.

Joe: Correct.

Chris: As we know, less than 7% of all RVers actually use washer and dryers for, so for the 93% of the customers that we do have, it’s just more storage. Also, you have these hidden storages right here as well. Under here and then also you have that on the other side too.

Joe: Which, which you don’t see in other brands.

Chris: Correct.

Joe: Also, the cutout into the front cab, you can use that for folding clothes or for shoes, it’s kind of endless.

Chris: We were talking earlier about the radius interior ceiling that we had down in the family room. Also, the benefit, the major benefit it does here, it gives you up to 6 foot 8 head room.

Joe: Yes, and you are much taller than me, so … (laughs)

Chris: I’m 6 foot 6 so I have plenty of room up here to maneuver. Also, with the second air conditioning that we [00:10:00] is in our standard run, and this is a ducted second air conditioning and here’s your thermostat right here because you do have the dual zone thermostat.

Joe: Correct.

Chris: So you can set a different temperature up here in the night, during a different temperature during the daytime. Because you can also run this reverse effect also, in the daytime you can run this air, which feeds the entire coach and during the night time you can run the main air in the family room, which runs down through the whole length of the coach duct wise.

Joe: Now, now once again, the, the upper deck of this fifth wheel is insulated as well.

Chris: Absolutely.

Joe: a lot of them are not. This has full insulation underneath the, the decking of this to keep your R value, where it should be. You know, when it’s cold weather you won’t lose your heat through the floor of this.

Chris: We were talking a little bit ago also, your 32 inch bedroom TV, which is standard in the Montana and again, that is on a swing arm as well also. All of our TV’s are on swing arms. One thing I want to bring up also Joe, we were talking about convenience in RVing is, every window in our Montanas open.

Joe: Yes.

Chris: Okay, and the camp-, competition can’t say that. We’re, if we’re going to put a window there, we’re going to put it to where you can open it so you have that cross ventilation.

Joe: And with the exception of your slide outs on the ends of your slide outs, they are all, insulated safety glass windows and frameless, too. So they have a beautiful look on the outside.

Chris: if you look at attention to detail Joe, you can notice the hardwood door that we have here.

Joe: Yes.

Chris: And with that, a-, goes along with that, is our wood casing because we give you 3 inch interior walls.

Joe: You watch, we have a real, a real door, a real door header over this.

Chris: We have headers …

Joe: Correct.

Chris: Unlike the competition that doesn’t have headers.

Joe: Yup.

Chris: Okay.

Joe: And you can’t move it, and this, it is very sturdy.

Chris: 3 inch interior wall, so when you shut your doors it’s not going to shake the wall and it’s not flimsy. This is our new counter top design, wood look here where before it was a laminated countertop with much more storage and space with our deep drawers throughout. Once again, you can never have too much storage.

Joe: And full extension roller ball bearings, metal drawer glides.

Chris: Absolutely.

Joe: What’s, residential to hold up, to take the rigors of, of full time use if need be. [00:12:00]

The video of this presentation by Petes RV Center is available at: https://youtu.be/sgDdKFeb3Tc

Video Transcript | 2016 Keystone Montana Fifth Wheel Features (Part 2 of 2) (CC)

Joe Vartuli: Hi folks, we’re back out here at the, the Montana Residential Living, the new Montana Residential Living Fifth-Wheels, Luxury Fifth-Wheels. Chris is still with us. He’s going to point out some great features, on the front cap, this, this new pin box, and some of the other great features that, that once again separate from the other stuff.

Chris Stender: Joe, our buyers tell us that there’s three characteristics to the Montana which sets the competition apart. The first of all is the MORryde pin box. Second of all is the aerodynamic front cap. And we’ll get around to the side we’ll talk about the MORryde suspension system as well, also. But I want to start with the MORryde pin box. What this allows you to do, Joe, is towing fifth-wheels when you’re accelerating and decelerating, you get what they call bucking and chucking.

Joe Vartuli: Yes.

Chris Stender: What this does is, this minimizes your bucking and chucking. It moves an inch and a half forward, inch and a half back, three-quarters of an inch right, three-quarters of an inch left, because it’s a rubberization system in the MORryde pin box. Rubber reacts faster than gases and fluids, so this minimizes that bucking and chucking.

A lot of our competitors use the large king-pin with the gas shock, with the bladder, that is just … Who knows how to work it? But all that is, is for vertical, but that’s what your tow vehicle’s for, is for vertical suspension. We got it right. We do horizontal up-front, we do vertical in our suspension, where our competition does it backwards. They do vertical in their kingpin, they do horizontal in their suspension, which we’ll talk about in a few minutes.

Also, with our aerodynamic cap, Joe, I can’t tell you you’re going to save two, three miles per hour. But you can take a look at it. It’s just the way it is. It’s what they call a European style aerodynamic front cap.

Joe Vartuli: Right. And then it’s cut in on the sides for your short box pick-ups as well.

Chris Stender: Yeah. We talk about turning radius, some of the competitors talk about [inaudible 00:01:56] turning radius. Actually, our front frame, Joe, there’s an actual [00:02:00] radius front frame, where your competitors, it’s a box frame, or it’s a forty-five degree cut frame. So our cap follows our line of our frame behind it. Also you have the hitch vision mirror. When you’re backing up, not only do you have your LED light here for night-time loading, but you have your hitch vision also which you can see from your tow vehicle as well too.

Joe Vartuli: Absolutely. That’s a great feature. It makes it easier on your neck when you’re hitching up in your fifth wheel.

Chris Stender: Absolutely.

Joe Vartuli: Also, automotive paint.

Chris Stender: Yes, on the new Residential Living Package in the Montana, we have a partial painted front cap which is standard. We’ve always been middle-of-the-road, neutral, non-confrontational, monotone. But in the Montana Residential Living Package, you have the partial painted front cap.

Also, we have your LED front lights which we were talking about in your control panel inside. You have one on the door side, one on the off-door side. People have told us that in campgrounds, if they’ve gone for a bike ride or a walk, they’ll put these on. That way they can see where they’re at a couple roads over.

Joe Vartuli: It’s certainly … They do stand out, that’s for sure.

Chris Stender: Joe, let’s talk about also your propane tanks. You have standard propane tanks … [cross talk 00:03:08]

Joe Vartuli: We have thirty pounds … Is the standard. Correct.

Chris Stender: Standard thirty-pound LP tanks. But here’s the big difference for a lot of your competition, okay. First of all, we have one on each side.

Joe Vartuli: Correct.

Chris Stender: Okay. The reason for that is weight distribution. Also, the reason we put one on each side rather than two, because your baggage compartment doors, Joe, are the same size and your pass-through storage is the same dimensions throughout. Where if I were to put two LP tanks on the off-door side, all of a sudden your baggage compartment gets much smaller plus your weight distribution is off.

Joe Vartuli: Correct.

Chris Stender: Another feature I want to show you is notice how we’re using the gas struts, okay. We don’t put clips up here that rust or corrode, and we definitely don’t put magnets up on the side of our Montana Fifth-Wheels, okay. Because I don’t want something to let go and hit me in the head.

Joe Vartuli: [laughs]

Chris Stender: [00:04:00] One thing I also want to show you as well, too, is part of our central vacuum system we were talking about inside Joe, remember we had the twenty-five foot expandable hose?

Joe Vartuli: Yes, we did.

Chris Stender: This is your exterior port, which goes right here, and that way you can sweep your pass-through storage, sweep your outdoor carpet, works sweet.

Joe Vartuli: Josh is showing you how big this really is. You can put a lot of stuff in there.

Chris Stender: Massive storage. And the reason for this is, Joe, is because we have what we call drop-frame pass-through storage. Because our twelve-inch I-beam frame on the Montana is standard, and your eight-inch I-beam is a drop-frame.

Joe Vartuli: Right.

Chris Stender: A lot of your competitors, when you’re on the outside, you think “Wow, that’s a lot of storage”, but when you open the door, you’re floor’s like elevated.

Joe Vartuli: There’s no hump, this is all flush all the way through.

Chris Stender: Absolutely, it’s a drop-frame pass-through storage.

Joe Vartuli: I, I do notice that’s a heat port, and so we have a heated basement.

Chris Stender: Absolutely. Right here, this is radiant heat. When you have your furnace on it is radiant heat, will heat your pass-through storage. Also another feature I want to talk about also, Joe, is what we call our friction hinge entry door, okay. I don’t have any plastic clips anymore that break.

Joe Vartuli: Thank God.

Chris Stender: Okay, so you’re not replacing them all the time. So it is a friction hinge entry door, okay. Another feature I want to show you also is what we call our new screen door. How many times customers have to open that up and then when they go back outside, they have to shut it again. So now from the inside, you just push that down from the inside now.

Joe Vartuli: Talk about convenience. I don’t know how many years people have been asking for a new, a new type of door, a new way to open up their screen door. That’s much, much better.

Chris Stender: We take this for granted, but you know there’s so many people that have four, five, six, seven, eight, ten year old RV’s that have never seen this. We have to be able to show that to the customer. Another standard feature, Joe, is your four-step entry. How many of our competitors are still using …

Joe Vartuli: Three steps.

Chris Stender: Our three step entry.

Joe Vartuli: Yup.

Chris Stender: Look how much more you have. I’m tall, and this is still a tall step for me right here. [00:06:00]

Joe Vartuli: Well, imagine if you’re elderly. It just, it’s much much better for you.

Chris Stender: With the fold-away handles. Once the door is shut, you have a nice large fold-away handle also. Our main awning, Joe, is a power awning, and it’s a two-position, and I’ll show you how that works, Joe.

Notice I’ll turn on the light as well, also.

Joe Vartuli: Ease of operation is terrific.

Chris Stender: I call this, this is two-stage power awning Joe, and I’ll tell you why. I can’t put it all the way out. Almost, okay. So let’s say you’re setting outside and it’s starting to rain hard, or let’s say the sun is dropping. All you do is just take this right here, and drop it, and just tighten this right here.

Joe Vartuli: So you can keep, you can have a …

Chris Stender: And the same with the other end.

Joe Vartuli: You can have a good pitch to it, like you said. Even if it’s raining, too, that’s another good feature.

Chris Stender: Absolutely.

Joe Vartuli: If, if you’re used to pitching your awning one way, the old style of manual awnings, you can still do this with a power awning.

Chris Stender: That way, what it does also is if it’s raining hard, you can drop it down. That way if it’s blowing you can still have your screen door on as well, too. This is our 3160 Rear Lounge Montana. This is our only Montana that gives you a second main awning on the outside, and that has lighting as well also. And this is also a two-stage awning as well, too. this is standard on the 3160 RL [cross talk 00:07:30]

Joe Vartuli: We’re pretty, we’re pretty close to the camper next to us, but you’re getting a good idea of how easy it does to work, how nice it looks with those LEDs, how it ties in with your entertainment center here.

Chris Stender: Thirty-two inch TV, again on a swing arm with an AM/FM CD/DVD player and a stereo as well, also. So, nice standard entertainment center on the outside with bus-style baggage compartment doors.

Joe Vartuli: Yes. More residential features for you: While you’re on the road, you want to be outside [00:08:00] watching NASCAR, you want to watch a ballgame, the kids want, want to watch a DVD … All these things you can do along with the storage and convenience the Montana offers you.

[camera cuts]

Joe Vartuli: We’re back over on the other side of the 3160 here. We’re going to show you the standard hydraulic six-point automatic leveling system. Chris is going to show you the control, the controller panel and just how it really does work. Once again, this will level you automatically. It takes all the guesswork out of everything.

Chris Stender: Joe, it’s as easy as a couple steps. First of all, when you’re backed into your spot, all you do is you hit the manual mode and then bring your front legs up. And what we’re doing right now is we’re lifting the front of it up to unhook it from your tow vehicle.

Joe, what I want to show you, part of the Residential Living Package which is new in the Montana, is we have what we call a solar panel prep. If you notice your compartment right up here, Furrion is the supplier that they do sell a portable solar panel which you can set outside your coach.

Joe Vartuli: Which we do offer to customers.

Chris Stender: And you can plug it in right here. That’s standard on all Montanas with the Residential Living Package. Another feature I want to show you, Joe, is the expandable ten-foot high-pressure hot and cold shower. We don’t use the white hose with the magic wand that you’re lucky to get your hair wet if you tried.

Also what this does is too, Joe, is if the people that want to winterize their own coaches, it’s very simple. Your winterize, your winterization system right here, you have your kit with a hose that comes down in your RV antifreeze. Once that’s in there, all you do is turn your water heater by-pass on, and then winterize, you turn that on. Winterizes the whole coach just for you.

Joe Vartuli: How easy is that? Instead of taking panels apart and everything else.

Chris Stender: Because your water pump is just on the backside so you don’t have to access your water pump. It’s one, two, three steps, done. Okay. Here’s your city water connection, which what we do, Joe, is we can run them up through the middle here, underneath here, run a hose [00:10:00], and that way it runs water into your coach.

Now, if you want to fill your freshwater tank, maybe before you hit the road, once your city water hooked up … See, it says tank fill power fresh, all you do is flip this lever right here, automatically fills your fresh water.

Joe Vartuli: Fills your fresh water tank.

Chris Stender: No more gravity filling in the back. I only have a vent now. So this fills much faster. Then also is your black tank flush here. What that does, it’s like a sprinkler system in your black tank. Because we all know when you dump your black tank, not all your debris gets let go.

Joe Vartuli: No, it can clump on the bottom, and this rinses from top to bottom for always a clean tank.

Chris Stender: If you don’t use your RV for a while you have a nice aroma when you walk in. But it’s a sprinkler system that sprays around, gets all the debris out of the coach. If you notice, also, our low point drains, Joe, why they’re in here. And the reason for that is, in the Montana product, our water lines are constructed in our floors. Our competition, your low point drains always come out underneath, but that means they run their water lines in their underbelly attached to the I-beam frame.

Joe Vartuli: And also I’m seeing your grey and tack, the grey, grey and black tank valves here, are also up on the inside and above the underbelly … [cross talk 00:11:08]

Chris Stender: And they’re straight out.

Joe Vartuli: … So they are insulated, correct.

Chris Stender: Your black tank is fifty gallons. Your grey tank is ninety-three, because you have a fifty-gallon for the bathroom and a forty-gallon for the kitchen. You always have your second grey tank lever. In this floor plan it’s located right here because of the cable system. We want to centralize it to the tank.

Joe Vartuli: Everything is on the inside. Nothing’s exposed on the outside of the coach where it can get broken off.

[camera cuts]

Joe Vartuli: Folks, I really hope you enjoyed this video from Pete’s RV today, and I really want to thank Chris Stender from Keystone Montana …

Chris Stender: Thank you as well, Joe. [shakes hand]

Joe Vartuli: … For training the whole staff, and showing us the great features and benefits of what the Montana’s really all about. go to our website, www.PetesRV.com. Look up our Montana page. Give me a call at Pete’s RV if you want some more information. We have some of the best pricing in the country and a great selection. Once again Chris, thank you.

Chris Stender: Thank you. [00:12:00] Appreciate your business.

Joe Vartuli: And hope you enjoyed it.

The video of this presentation by Petes RV Center is available at: https://youtu.be/RoGavsH8DxM

How to Clean Your RVs Holding Tanks Sensors

How to Clean Your RVs Holding Tanks Sensors
Wednesday, November, 26th 2014 15:26:23

Resident RV Expert Randy Murray discusses a multitude of ways to clean your gray/black water holding tank sensors, clearing all inaccurate monitor panel readings from your camper on the†Pete’s RV YouTube Channel.

Sometimes you may get a full tank reading on the monitor panel inside your camper even after youve dumped your gray and black tanks. Randy notes that this is generally caused by a buildup of waste materials or anything that might have made its way down the toilet. These items can block the sensors preventing the correct readout.

Randy provides a few preemptive approaches to make sure you won’t have to deal with that faulty reading. The first is making sure before you flush that you add extra water so the toilet paper (making sure you use RV toilet paper) won’t clump up or dry out to the inside of the tank walls, the next is making sure the tanks are as full as possible (making sure not to overfill) before they are dumped. Randy suggests the use of a tank flush chock to assist in filling your holding tank before it’s dumped.

The good news is that there are other tools for when all else fails. The first one Randy recommends is what’s called an RV swivel stick, which he explains attaches to a hose and sprays around water at a high velocity to break down any tank buildup. †Depending on whether you own a travel trailer or fifth wheel, a longer flexible version is available for the harder to reach holding tanks. Lastly, filling up a 5-gallon bucket with hot water and pouring it down the toilet should help alleviate the issue by steaming away the blockage from the sensors.

Pete’s RV Center is an extraordinary recreational vehicle dealer with locations in South Burlington, VT, Schererville, IN and South Windsor, CT. An RV sales and service provider since 1952, Pete’s RV Center carries an extensive inventory of Keystone, Crossroads, Coachman, Heartland, Evergreen and Forest River RV-branded campers.

To learn more from Randy as well as stay up to date on all things Pete’s RV be sure to visit and subscribe to our YouTube Channel.

How to Properly Use The Air Conditioner in Your Camper

How to Properly Use The Air Conditioner in Your Camper
Wednesday, July 3oth 2014 20:03:48

Learn All About Using Your Campers Air Conditioning on the Pete’s RV YouTube channel.

Randy gives a quick important lesson teaching us that air conditioners work by removing warm air and moisture from around the room, which then gets sucked outside leaving the room cooler.

In order to make sure your AC is running properly, Randy shows us how to remove and check the air filter to make sure there isn’t a buildup of dirt and dust hindering performance. Making sure the fan is on will increase efficiently with the AC system, as well as making sure that all doors, windows, and shades are closed to prevent heat from working its way back inside the camper.

Randy advises turning on the AC when temperatures are cooler (typically early morning) for optimal air flow and a cooler camper throughout the day. By using the quick cool option to restrict airflow from the ducts, the AC can effectively cool the room faster and when it reaches a temperature to your liking, airflow can be redirected back through the vents for everyone to enjoy.

To learn more from Randy and stay up to date on all things Pete’s RV be sure to visit and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Video Transcript | How to Properly Use The Air Conditioner in Your Camper

Randy: Hey guys, Randy with Pete’s RV TV today, another quick-tip segment for you. Today I’m going to talk about air conditioners and the proper way to use them. I’ve been taking a lot of calls around the country and we’re in the middle of our warm season in Vermont, the little warm season that we get up here in the northeast. But people are having trouble with their air conditioners freezing up. People are saying they’re not cooling properly for them. And sometimes that’s the case, but usually it’s operator error about 99 percent of the time.

When I went to RVIA school back a million years ago when I first started in the industry and got certified to do this kind of stuff, one of the first things they taught me about air conditioners is they don’t make cool. They remove heat and they remove moisture, as well. cool just happens to be a byproduct.

So, when we allow our coach to heat up inside, we go to the pool all day, we’re out shopping or doing, visiting the sights around the area and we’ve got the air conditioner off, we go back to our camper at 5 o’clock at night. It’s 100 degrees inside the camper. We turn that air conditioner on. That air conditioner actually has to pull the heat out of the carpet, out of the bedding, out of the couches, out of everything inside before we start to feel cool.

So what I want you to do is I want you to do is turn that air conditioner on in the morning. it’s a little bit cooler at night, so when it’s a little bit cooler at night, of course, the coach stays a little bit cooler. So when you get up in the morning set that thermostat at about 65 degrees, 67 degrees. Let’s maintain that cool from the night before. Now, if we never let our coach heat up, the air conditioner is going to have to work a lot less hard to maintain that cool and we’re actually saving energy.

The other thing that we want to do with our air conditioner, too, is while we maintain it while we’re using it is we want to make sure that the filters are clean. So we can remove that very easily on this guy here and we just want to take this guy out and make sure it’s vacuumed. If it starts to turn brown that usually means there’s a lot of dust.

Another thing that makes an air conditioner work very effectively for us, or makes them work better, is more air flow. So with a clean filter we can get more air through this air conditioner, especially on those [00:02:00] hot, humid days.

the other thing we’ll, we’ll want to do is we want to set our fan on high. I usually use the auto setting on mine, if you let the air conditioner run all day. Again, the more air that we’re moving, the more heat we can take out of the coach and expend outside and put the cold air back inside the coach. So fan definitely on high.

We also want to make sure our doors and windows and vents are closed. I went to a camper on a campground the other day. A lady says, “My air conditioner is not cooling very well. Can you take a look at it?” I went inside. I put my hand up to the air conditioner, it was cooling just fine. What she had was both of her doors were open. She had some vents open, a couple windows open. So what that air conditioner was doing was pulling the heat from the outside and just getting rid of that and returning it so it could never bring the temperature of the coach down because it was just kind of maintaining.

What these guys will do is they’ll actually do about a 20-degree air differential, air temperature differential. So, it sucks in here, blows out here or out through our vents, and it’s going to be about a 20-degree differential. Now, if it’s just pulling air from a door, it’s never going to really bring the temperature of the coach down, so make sure all windows and doors and vents are closed. and again, that high air flow moving through the air conditioner is going to get that heat escape faster and help us with freeze up a little bit, too. The moisture will actually pass over the evaporator coil a lot quicker and not have a tendency to grab on there.

Another thing, we just got to our campgrounds, its 5 o’clock at night, we’ve been traveling all day, inside the camper it’s very hot because it’s a hot day out, so you got to turn your air conditioner on to cool this guy down. Instead of forcing it through the vents, if you’ve got a ducted air conditioner, open up the quick-cool option. This way we’re going to get a lot of airflow and we’re going to cool the coach down a little bit quicker.

Once we bring the temperature down, we can go ahead and close this and we can go through the ducts. The ducts are going to restrict the airflow a little bit, but once we bring the coach down the air conditioner is running efficiently, then we can go ahead and put it through the vents in the ceiling.

So if you try out my quick tips here, run it on high, set it in the morning, let it run all day to keep that cool inside so we don’t have to remove all that heat from building up in the sun all day. Also, if you can close your shades and things [00:04:00] like that, keep the UVs down, that’s going to help out a lot as well.

But all these should help you make your air conditioner work a lot more effectively for you. Save a phone call to me and just have a better camping experience, keep you guys cool. Now, out there having fun, you get hot, you want to come into a cool area, at least I do, and it makes it a lot more fun when you’re drinking a soda or whatever while you’re watching TV, as well.

So thanks again for watching Pete’s RV with Randy today. keep an eye out for our quick tips. Join us on our Facebook page. Sign up [ 00:04:26] on Youtube and happy camping (laughs). Have a great one.

 

How to Prevent Damage to Your Camper’s Water Heater

How to Prevent Damage to Your Camper’s Water Heater
Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014 18:00:03

PetesRV.com Resident RV Expert Randy Murray brings attention to a common mistake made by turning on the hot water heater and how to prevent any damage from occurring.

When it comes to using the hot water heater in your camper, it’s crucial to make sure that there is actually water in the tank. Randy stresses that no water in the tank results in a burned out electric element–rendering the hot water heater useless.

Randy demonstrates an insanely simple way to prevent the element from getting damaged. Every hot water heater is equipped with a pressure relief valve. It functions to protect the water heater from building up to much pressure. If it does, water is released from the valve. A quick press on the spring-loaded valve handle will tell you immediately whether or not there is water in the tank. If there is, you are good to fire up the water heater. If not, check hookups and bypass valves to ensure water flowing to the tank.

Learn more tips and service advice from Randy as well as much more on the Pete’s RV YouTube Channel.

Setting Up Dual 12 Volt Camper Batteries

Setting Up Dual 12 Volt Camper Batteries
Monday May 19th, 2014 19:02:48

Resident RV Expert Randy Murray displays how to properly connect two 12 volt batteries in parallel for extended dry camping power.† Rather than a single battery connection where you will be required to replace it with a fresh battery, a dual connection alleviates this procedure and provide more even use of battery life.

By connecting the campers positive wire to the positive terminal on one battery and connecting the campers ground wire to the negative terminal on the second battery, Randy illustrates the correct way to achieve equal battery drain and how to ensure top notch battery life.

With the use of jumper wires (one for both positive and negative as Randy explains) that are equal or greater to the gauge of wire found on your camper, connect each line to the corresponding positive and negative battery to complete the connection and enjoy some extended dry camping.

Make sure to subscribe to the Pete’s RV YouTube channel for more quick tips and information on sales and other events!

The Importance of RV Slide Toppers

Importance of RV Slide Toppers | RV Quick Tips
Tuesday, March 25th, 2014 22:31:37

 

Learn All About Slide Toppers on the Pete’s RV YouTube Channel

Resident RV Expert Randy Murray delivers on a crucial RV question via the Pete’s RV YouTube Channel, “What is the importance of slide toppers (aka slideout awnings)?”

When it comes to protecting the vitality and value of your RV, slideout seals found around the slide are the lifeline to the health and well-being of your camper. As Randy explains, if you compromise or damage those seals then you risk water potentially penetrating into the camper provoking damage over time.

Randy presents a prime example of just how well slide toppers can defend your camper after a weekend at the campground. Sprinkling a box full of debris on the slides to simulate a weekend of buildup, you can clearly see that everything rolls off as the slides are brought in.

A highly-affordable investment, slide toppers can save RV owners thousands of dollars in repairs! For just a few extra dollars a month, their installation can be built right into your new RV payment plan.

Determining a Camper’s Insulation R-Value

Determining a Camper’s Insulation R-Value
Tuesday, December 3rd 2013 21:10:37

RV Lifestyle Consultant Randy Murray unfolds the mystery of the R-Value in relation to how well a camper is insulated on the Pete’s RV YouTube Channel.

When shopping for a new camper, the salesperson will usually sling around R-Values like they’re the next best thing since the black tank flush. The only problem is that these values hold little meaning to you other than the bigger the number the better the insulation.

R-Value is a measurement of thermal resistance. There is a scale and calculations surrounding R-Value, but as Randy points out, you can take a much less technical approach to determine how well an RV is insulated:

1. Look for visible proof of sound insulation construction practices such as a sealed underbelly, finished storage compartments, and the use thermal foil beneath the carpet in slideouts.

2. Request a breakaway view of the RV you are shopping. This allows you to see where and what type of insulating materials are used throughout the coach. Quite a few manufacturers provide breakaway views in their brochures and promotional materials. A salesperson that is on the ball can get you this information plus be at your service to point out all of the insulation features found in any camper that is on your buying radar.

3. Hints of a good R-Value is a camper with a published temperature rating. Nowadays, most campers come with a thermal package (i.e. “Arctic Package”). Manufacturers relate these packages with a degree rating (some are even third-party certified). Note here that while manufacturers push how well these coaches perform in cold weather, it is also a good indicator that they are equally effective keeping interiors cool in hot weather.

Per Randy’s mention on how helpful it is to see a breakaway view of an RV to determine who well it is insulated, Pete’s RV makes current year brochures available on our website for all of the brands we carry as well as owner’s manuals.

Basic parts and accessories to help improve your RV’s insulating performance in hot and cold weather are available in-store and online at Pete’s RV. You’ll find items such as joint sealants, hot water heater blankets, and window shades.

Video Transcript | How  Do I Determine a Camper’s Insulation R-Value?

 

Randy: Hey guys Randy with Petes RV TV here today, another quick tip segment for you. Today Im going to talk about R-values and what they do for your camper and pretty much what they are. So an R-value is a way we measure our insulation value in the unit. You know R-value is a measurement of thermal resistance so how quickly heat passes through whatever we are trying to block it with pretty much. So in the RV world our values are often exploded, so they, they say that they are a lot better than they actually are.

 

So a really great thing to do if you want to educate yourself best on the product that you are purchasing is ask to see a breakdown of the unit. See where the insulation is in the unit. Some of our manufactures will supply us with things like this. This is actually a floor for a big horn this is a laminated floor, and this is a very well insulated floor. This is the roof of the same big horn unit; its a laminated roof.

 

Its going to take a while for heat to pass through that so this has got a pretty good R-value in it. Also in the RV world we are passing were adding things like this here foil wrap here to a floor, under a floor, which also creates some thermal protection for us as well. And that will add and stack a little bit of an R-value.

 

When we get in to our less expensive units our aluminum sided campers and things like that, they are going to have a little less R-value in it than we are going to see on say like a fiberglass sided camper just because of the insulation they are using, the thickness of the walls. A little bit less expensive unit were apt to see a little less insulation. Insulation is a little bit expensive. So another great way that you can find out how well a unit is insulated is some manufactures will put a degree rating on the unit.

You know, everybody will say oh my walls are a R11 and my floors are R27, what have you. What is that camper good down to? What has it been tested at? Not everybody does this but some of the big manufactures will do this when you look at like some of the Cougars. Theyre tested down to 20 degrees and some of these guys are even going a little bit further than [02:00] that when we get up into the Montanas and the big horns.

 

Were seeing a zero degree rated unit with the furnace on, so grab a brochure or go to a website or go to our website, petesrv.com. Weve got all our product on there with brochures and pdfs so you can see the breakdowns. On this Cougar here, if Josh will pan in on it, we can see that they have showed us how they have put the insulation in the roof and into the floor systems and things like that.

 

That way we can see what kind of insulation we are getting in the rig, if its going to work in our particular application. People are using these a lot further in the fall now, A lot earlier in the spring. Camp grounds are opening up a little bit more so here is another great example. Bullet from Keystones has actually done a great breakdown and shows us how they insulate their walls and their floors systems. So educate yourself on what you are getting and if its an important thing for you make sure that you know what you are talking about and your sales guy knows what you are talking about.

 

If you have any questions you can always give us a call. Wed be happy to educate you on it and talk about those degree ratings and how you are going to be using the unit, and if its not the perfect insulated unit for you, how you can achieve to use it in the circumstance that you want to use it and if youre going to be trying to use it in a little colder weather as well.

 

Another thing that people dont think about with R-values too is warm weather. When we have an air conditioner on inside and its really hot outside the R-values are going to help keep us cool as well. So if youre in a climate that has a little bit warmer and your down in the southwest or something like that, where we see lot longer heat days for more portion of the summer the R-values are going to be very important for you as well, too.

 

So make sure you know about R-values, make sure you know what you are getting, if you have any questions at all feel free to contact us. Check out the information. We try to provide as much as we can for you on our web site, also on our Facebook page as well.

So there it is in a nut shell, R-values. Thanks for watching Petes RV with Randy today.

RV Winterization To Do List

RV Winterization To Do List
Tuesday, October 8th, 2013 20:37:56

RV Lifestyle Consultant Randy Murray neatly ties together his series of winterization videos with a short introduction on preparing your camper for cold weather storage.

The primary areas he touches on:

1. Water System – Use non-toxic anti-freeze
2. Spot Sealing – Inspect and treat all exterior joints and seams
3. Awning – Clean and dry before storing
4. Battery – Disconnect and store indoors
5. Tires – Inspect, clean, torque lug nuts, and using tire covers a sound decision
6. Refrigerator – Clean with disinfectant and prop door open during storage
7. Rodent Control – Inspect for openings and treat with dauber screens & Mouse Free
8. RV Cover – Regular tarps do not breathe or provide a snug fit.

Related videos for all of the above can be found on the extremely educational Pete’s RV YouTube Channel’s RV Service Tips playlist.

Please remember that Randy’s demonstrations cover general RV winterization tasks. All campers come equipped differently, so be sure to consult with your owner’s manual.

The winterizing parts and accessories recommended in this and related videos are on sale at the Pete’s RV Parts & Accessories Store.

LED Awning Lights | Petes RV Parts Store Spotlight

LED Awning Lights | Petes RV Parts Store Spotlight
Wednesday, July 24th, 2013 21:55:56

LED awning lights are one of the newest additions to the Pete’s RV parts line-up. This exciting new product provides a new way to light up your campsite and decorate your awning. The lights come in 2 different sets, one being white and the other is a 16 color multi-functional kit. Also these LEDs are rated for 50,000 hours of life and are waterproof!

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LED Awning Light Kit,16 Colors, 16FT

The cool thing about these LED lights is that they come in a 16 ft roll and may be cut to accommodate most lengths of awnings. On the back of the lights is a adhesive tape which makes the application of the lights very easy. The multiple functions of the 16 color kit include strobe and fade functions which add to the value of the kit. You can also change the brightness of the lights from the wireless remote which allows you to set the mood for any occasion.

 

All of the products featured Pete’s RV Parts Store Spotlight can be found in As Seen on PRV-TV online at PetesRVparts.com. Take a look at current sales and discounts on RV parts and accessories.

Along with the website, Pete’s RV Parts & Accessories Store has locations in Indiana and Vermont. We carry Trailer and Fifth Wheel Hitches, Cleaners, Sanitation and Water Treatments, Covers, Awnings, Leveling Jacks, Marshmallow Skewers, String Lights and other fun stuff for camping!

Our extensive inventory of RV parts and accessories includes such reputable brands as Equal-i-zer, Reese, Best, Adco and Camco.

Mouse & Rodent-Proofing Your Camper

Mouse & Rodent-Proofing Your Camper
Friday, March 1st, 2013 20:03:07

Service Writer and resident RV expert Randy Murray educates viewers on an effective solution for keeping mice and rodents out of your camper or motorhome. Setting traps and scattering dryer sheets when not in use does not prevent these critters from getting into the coach.

While making their way into an RV, mice and rodents can create thousands of dollars in damage to wiring, tubing, and other vulnerable materials found in the undercarriage and sidewalls.

Mouse-Free-1-Gallon-RV-Mouse-Repelling-Undercarriage-Lubricant-With-Spray-Gun-repellent-mice-rodents-trailer-boat-USAMouse Free is a non-toxic formula that stops the entry of mice into your RV. It keeps them and other pests from entering through the small holes and cavities on the underside of your motorhome or trailer.

As Randy explains, Mouse Free contains natural oils like peppermint that acts as a repellent to rodents’ keen sense of smell (and primary means of navigation). These fragrances are much stronger and retain their potency longer than dryer sheets or balsam repellents.

Mouse Free is available at  the Pete’s RV Parts and Accessories Store at all locations and online.

The makers of Mouse Free recommend it be applied annually with a compression sprayer. One gallon of Mouse Free treats up to a 24 foot RV. If you prefer not to go the do-it-yourself route, an authorized dealer such as Pete’s RV offers an affordable application service that can be performed during winterization or regular maintenance visits